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There are many small businesses that have had their plans interrupted this year by COVID. Printhie Wines, based in Orange NSW is no exception. Not only have they had to deal with COVID this year, but they were also coming off the back of dealing with a severe drought that had lasted for a long time PLUS the bushfires that engulfed parts of New South Wales over the summer.

Emily Swift joined her husband in their family business in 2018 as their Marketing Manager. Having worked as a strategic marketer in the agribusiness and utility sectors for over 20 years, she made the leap into small business, just in time to have to navigate possible one of the toughest years that the winery has faced.

In this interview with Em, we find out all about the world of wine marketing. We talk about the power of harnessing strategic local partnerships AND about how some quick thinking in the COVID crisis produced some amazing marketing results for Printhie Winery.

Interview Transcript:

Jane:

Welcome to the how to do marketing show Emily.

Emily:

Oh, thank you, Jane. It’s great to be here.

Jane:

It’s great to have you. And as I said in the introduction, you and I go way back, we first met at Charles Sturt university. You were studying comms and I was studying marketing and I think we both shared the subject of advertising. If I remember.

Emily:

I do remember that. Absolutely.

Jane:

Yes. And we both followed our careers in, in marketing. And now I am going to ask you so many questions about the dream job that I always wanted to have, Em, always fathomed. And I always pictured myself in a role of, wine marketing. So I’d love for you to shed some light on this career and I’m sure you will. So, firstly, let’s deep dive into that. I always, envisaged and it could be true that wine marketing was this super glamorous and super cultured and really fun industry to be in. I remember when I was kind of lost with marketing and I didn’t know which path to take, this was years and years ago. And I thought, oh, what am I passionate about? And I came up with wine and fashion.

Jane:

So I, I went down one rabbit hole of kind of getting into that, wine. Cause I thought it’s, you know, we love to drink it. It’s a great product. It seems like lots of fun. And people have lots of fun when they drink it. But I also love the nuances and the complexities about the product. Like it’s such an incredible product range to get your head around and you know, the romance and the beauty of the vineyards and the origins, you know, in France and Italy and all the risks, like it just has so much storytelling that can kind of accompany this product and the brands that go with it, but tell us is wine basketing as glamorous and as fun-filled as it seems

Emily:

Look, and there’s still time for you to, if you want to get into one mode it’s certainly fun. It, you know, it’s like you said, it’s a fabulous product. And it’s so attached to those things like food and events and experiences and these, and these great lifestyle activities. But I probably would not go so far as to say it’s super glamorous. I’m sure somewhere in the world, there’s a super glamorous wine marketing job, but you know, unfortunately, to make something with glamorous, it takes a lot of, you know, not so glamorous work. And you know, in part of my role I’ve I still have to go out and clean the toilets at the silver door and make wine deliveries. It’s not, so glamorous yeah. That beautiful romance about the product. And it is a lot of fun, you know, thinking up how you can tell your story because you do understand that for a lot of people drinking wine is an escape it’s , it’s part of these beautiful visions of vineyards and overseas and holidays and spending time with friends.

Emily:

So it is a fun product to work with in terms of that, like there’s a lot of scope to play with and, and if you can tap into that rate you know, that, that feeling of romance and that aspirational lifestyle, then, you can do some really great stuff.

Jane:

Yeah, yeah. And I can completely say that and I guess to put it into context for our listeners, it’s probably not every wine marketer that has to go and clean the toilets. It’s just because you work as part of it a family run business and vineyard. So whenever you work for small businesses, a lot of us small business owners and listeners would understand that you sometimes wear many hats, but I imagine, if you’re in a corporate marketing role and working for, you know, Moet and Chandon or, someone like that perhaps to cleaning toilets is let’s put

Emily:

That caveat in there on a payday for everyone part of it.

Jane:

But I think that’s the best thing about working for small businesses that every now and again, you get down to the cold face, you understand how the business functions and what, and all of the certain things that need to happen in order for your marketing to actually, you know, drive results. So, yeah. Oh, good. Okay. So it’s definitely as fun and mostly glamorous, but occasionally requires some, you know, wearing of different hats. Okay, good. So when it comes to planning out your marketing for the year or the quarter, what are some of the considerations that you need to think through before deciding what marketing activity that, that, that you’ll invest in?

Emily:

Oh, look, there’s some really basic stuff that you just put in automatically. So, you know, for any wine marketing person, you’ve got to look at, your product when one of the bottling dates, when is there a new wine being released when’s that coming out and things like wine shows cross your fingers, you’re going to have a good story to tell from that. And also wine days are becoming a bigger thing, like it’s Chardonnay day or and look as sure as day was just introduced to this year. Cause you know, we realized that there wasn’t really an Australian shreds day. So there was several of us that had gone on board with that and started trying because you can put a marketing you know, campaign around that, you might have a special pack for Shiraz day that you can promote in the lead up to it. So they’re just some really good staple markers to put in your calendar. But for us, we’ve, also got sponsorships. So we’re the official wine partner for the New South Wales swifts netball team. So for us, that’s a seasonal activity as well that we you know, putting the calendar and we’ve got to work out activities around that, that we can, you know, get the best value out of that sponsorship and our position as their wine partner. But also the biggest consideration for us.

Jane:

So you just got to the point of your biggest, the biggest consideration that you have.

Emily:

So yeah, the biggest consideration for us is that, we have a tight budget, like lots of other small businesses. So for me, I try and think about what free media we can get like free media is our best friend. So and part of that is, you know, looking still using traditional media releases, but also looking at pinpointing those micro influences. And part of that I think is really building relationships with other like-minded complimentary brands so that you can pick up some social media opportunities in there and mentions. And I think that’s a really important component of that is forming those relationships. Other things that we’re using more and more Facebook and Instagram advertising, you know, it’s cost-effective incredibly targeted in as quick to implement and look, if you make a mistake, it’s easy to fix.

Emily:

So it’s, it’s such an adaptable and cost-effective channel to use. I have to say I’ve been upskilling in that area a little bit, to be honest, like from previous corporate roles, I’ve had the luxury of having a digital team, you know, we might do all the strategy and the creative around it and the planning, but I’ve had a digital team to go and actually implemented and a media planning agency to actually go and book those ads. So I’ve been upskilling myself because I’m the one doing that now. And, you know, I’ve really enjoyed that because it’s just given me even greater insight into how to really use those channels. So and it’s just showing me actually how easy it is to, to get out there on a pretty minimal budget to get your brand out there on those platforms. And also, when I’m doing my planning, I also need to consider what we have different target markets.

Emily:

You know, well, we do have several product lines, so we have different target markets for each of those. And our wine club is a target market on its own. So, you know, when I’m going through working out the marketing, I’ve got to work out how I’m talking to each of those target groups and you know, what touch points you know, how we’re talking to them at each of those touch points. So, yeah, it was a fair bit that goes into it and it really, it’s not probably unlike any other product. But it’s just the nuances, I guess, in terms of you know, some of those timings around product releases and things like that.

Jane:

Yeah. Yeah. That’s really interesting. And I want to pick up on, on something that you mentioned around the micro influencers, because a couple of weeks ago we heard from a guy called Neil Schaffer who specializes in influencer marketing. And he essentially, I guess kind of gave us more perspective about the real potential that there is with this influencer marketing kind of tactic. And he mentioned nano influencers and he said, you know there’s plenty of influencers. And I’m saying, you know, doing the little quotation marks with my fingers there that we can tap into that sometimes are a hell of a lot more effective than tapping into, you know, these macro influencers that have, you know, a million followers or whatever these nano influencers can have, like a super, super engaged audience that matches your own. And that brand alignment seems like a really logical kind of fusion. How, in terms of, of micro influences, how do you incorporate them into your marketing?

Emily:

Yeah, and I think, you know, it’s, there is just to touch on the, the major, you know, the really big influences compared to the nano the micro influences. I think there’s been a bit of a trend well, from what I’m seeing a much bigger trend to now focus those important micro-influencers because I think we’re all getting a little bit skeptical. We understand now that those large influencers are being paid and they don’t necessarily love the product. You know, I think the micro-influencers, it really does feel more like it’s the word of mouth, you know, they’re actually like that product, or they wouldn’t bother promoting it because quite often they’re not being paid for it. It’s just sure, I actually really love that product and I wanted to talk about it, so you believe it more. And whilst you might get that mass coverage you get so much more value and trust out of it.

Emily:

Then potentially if you’ve paid, you know, a large influencer, but I also think if you can find that perfect influencer that has a mass following and is absolutely perfect for your product, then it probably is worthwhile paying the money. So I think there’s, you know, there’s definitely a spot for all of them, but for us right now you know, those smaller influences are really important to us. And we like to kind of choose people that have a very similar outlook, I think, in terms of their brand. And we’re all about authenticity and being honest and, you know, just trying to show our true story. So if we can pick up that and all the brand is very much doing that. And also you know, obviously interested in wine and we can say that, yeah, there could be a nice partnership and, and I literally just start chatting to them. And seeing if you’re up there, they’re on the same page and would they be interested and look, you’ve just got to put yourself out there and ask the question to me, to these guys. Some of them are, think it’s great and look, you will get knock backs, but that’s just part of it. Like you can’t keep up and just keep going out and, and we’ve been having some great responses to that.

Jane:

Yeah. And that’s powerful meetings and I think that’s Testament to the brand that you’ve built as well. And the products that you sell because print the vineyards is, you know, is now quite an established brand and it’s a premium brand, and it has some premium products that has some fantastic products. You’ve won a lot of awards for your products. So in terms of actually reaching out to some of like-minded and aligned, you know, micro influences, a lot of them would be quite thrilled to, to work with you, particularly if they kind of see themselves as, as fitting into that, that category, because you’ve built that brand and you’ve gone to the effort of actually building that, that product and that brand around and the story, I guess, around what you do.

Jane:

So I think that makes it easier for any partnership opportunity to, to be able to actually reach out and get a positive response. And yeah, sure. There might be some people that knock you back, but generally that might just be because, well, they might not see the value, in that partnership, but two, it might not just be the right time. They might not be able to get their head around, you know, how they’re actually going to, to, to make this work for you all. Or it just could be all too hard for them.

Emily:

Oh, that’s right. And look, you know, sometimes it’s, you know, I think they’ve got lots of stuff going on and they need to just go, well, they’re not the right person. Yep.

Jane:

And that’s fine. Yeah. And that’s totally

Emily:

And that’s totally fine, but I think the important thing is you don’t give up, you keep going and you, cause there are like-minded people out there that are perfectly your brands, so yes.

Jane:

Yeah. Awesome. So let’s talk about your content marketing. So you’ve mentioned that you have a few different target audiences for, for the different wines that you sell. So obviously you’ve got a, a sparkling wine range and you’ve got some award-winning premium products in that range. And then you’ve got like a kind of table drinking, you know, weeknight kind of, and I won’t call it coughing wine cause it’s not really, like, it’s still a, you know, a 16 to $20 or more bottle of wine. You know, then you’ve got your red drinkers and your white drinkers and your party drinkers. And then as you said, you’ve got your wine club membership, which is a completely different product offering and probably a different mindset. I imagine that there are some commonalities that thread between all of those different target audience, but in terms of that content marketing, how do you decide what to talk about to engage each audience and ultimately sell each of those products?

Emily:

Yeah, look, it’s interesting. And I think, you know, well, there’s, what’s the old 80 to 20 ratio of you know, tell your story 80% of the time and sell 20% of the time. But to be honest, I don’t sit down and think about that ratio too much at all. Because I do above all us prioritize our storytelling, right. And you know, Simon Sinek’s famous quote, the, people don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it. And for us, that’s our real stories that we have that passion for our wine and, and the guys just love working in the vineyards and there is a thrill for them around creating, you know, a wine that is enjoyed. So and look, they’ve tend tended some of those vines for 20 years and they know them individually.

Emily:

So it really is a deeply personal story. And they’re the stories that get the most engagement, especially the ones around Ed and Dave, who were the brothers that run the business any, you know, post or story around them gets the greatest engagement. So I do prioritize those. And then it’s interesting, you know, some of the other stories just about the dogs that we, you know, we have quite a few, well, not quite a few there’s three winery dogs. We turn them and people love hearing about the dogs. And then they also, I’ve found love hearing about the third generation coming through the children. And, you know, we’ve started doing little profiles on them. You know, obviously being conscious of not giving too much information away, but yeah.

Jane:

These are your own children, obviously. Yes.

Emily:

Yeah. So yeah, but people love seeing that very personal side. And then you do mix in a bit of the yep. Okay. Well, this is a new product or this product just got an award and actually our stories around awards to get quite a lot of engagement as well. But it does this come back to people want to know who you are, why are you doing what you’re doing? Yeah.

Jane:

Do you find that you, do you have the target audience that wants to know about the terror and white and the vintage and the, I don’t know, the science behind the wine making and the nuances of the particular seasons and those sorts of things. Do you have that market as well that you need to cater for?

Emily:

Definitely, there are the people who want to know the technical aspects. And I am actually conscious not to put too much of that info in social media because I know it will be too high brow for the general. And, you know, it he’s like we touched on earlier, it’s more about the lifestyle and the people love and just seeing the vineyards and things. Whereas we certainly do cater for those who would like more knowledge through other channels, we put more information into our ATM’s around out, at least we like to go into detail about it. So there’s certainly we have to be mindful that yes, we have people who just more interested in the aspirational, but we’ve certainly got you know, some great customers who are really interested in exactly what went in to the development of that wine. How long was it in Oak? Was it Newark? Was it older? It was an American Oak. So we certainly have to cater for that as well, but be mindful that we’ve just got to balance that out.

Jane:

Yeah, yeah. That makes a lot of sense. And during the COVID lockdown period earlier this year, I personally noticed a lot of the print, the marketing dropping into my Facebook feed, which I loved. Can you talk us through how you use Facebook and, and I imagine Instagram as one of your promotional channels, particularly, it seems like you were doing a lot of stuff around running live events and live tastings and things. So can you talk us through how, how you would, what you were doing with that?

Emily:

Yeah, so look it, it was an interesting, and I probably should go back a couple of steps how we found ourselves in that, in that position. Yes, it was definitely a COVID lockdown, but prior to that, you know, 2020 was already a pretty tough year for us. We’ve had several years of drought yields were low. Quite a few of the vineyards around us had already run out of water. We were micromanaging our water and you know, picking the absolute, perfect time to water the vineyard, to get the grapes through. And we were really thrilled with the quality of our grapes for the year. And then we did some final testing and it was at that point that we suddenly realized we had smoke taint in the vineyards. So we actually didn’t pick a single grape this year and that has a two year impact on the business.

Emily:

So not only do cause we also contract wine mag not only was the scale of that, you know, much decreased. But we also don’t have any wine for 2020. So we thought that was the bad start to the year and then COVID hit and we lost 70% of our business overnight in terms of Celador closing and restaurants closing. So that had a flow on effect to us. So look, to be honest, they would have been about a week there where we were kind of wondering, you know, what the hell we’re going to do and you know, so many other you know, wineries and cylinders and so many other businesses were impacted that way as well. So, but then I think over a glass of wine one night, I was like, well, we’ve just got to find the opportunities in this situation.

Emily:

We need to turn this around. We can’t just curl up in a ball and go, you know, too hard. So in a team meeting, I just said to the guys, I was like, right, we’re going to give some virtual tastings ago. I want you guys in front of the camera and we’re just going to talk about the wine. We’ve just got to put ourselves out there. So we did a test run and there’s, there’s sort of four the core team and, you know, they all interacted really well and we got great engagement and views just from that. And then we thought, right, we’re going to now schedule this in Friday 4:00 PM. And we put together a schedule of the wines so that you could pre-order. So you’d have the wine for a three week period. So for three weeks in one pack you had the wine that we were tasting, and then we will put out in the next pack.

Emily:

And it was really great. We, we were amazed that we ended up with some really loyal customers who joined in every week, rain hail or shine, and look, it wasn’t perfect. You know, we had issues with sound and so we were learning on the spot basically, but it was nice to see like the our view is actually we’re on that journey with us and, and look, we’re really encouraging. And it were, it was great to see that they kind of felt like they were part of that with us. But it was great in terms of the awareness that we got out of it. And look, a lot of other people were doing tastings. There was a lot of that going on, but for us, we wanted to take that extra step and do it live like a lot of them were prerecorded or recorded, to be honest, I would’ve probably preferred to pre-record and have it, you know, all nicely put together. But we understood that doing it live, you’re going to get better reach through Facebook and Instagram. So we thought let’s just give it a go and look, you know, one day the dog pretty much knocked over the tripod. And it’s, you know, that was part of the fun of it, really.

Jane:

The magic that candid, authentic, it’s just the blokes, you know, all the blokes and whoever else was there. And when you say that the team of four I’m assuming that’s the two boys Dave and Ed and the winemakers, it’s the two winemakers in the viticultural side, a bit of culture and are they all guys or?

Emily:

Always make sure we have two because it is look, honestly, it probably gets a bit boring watching one person talk about

Emily:

Wining, you need that, yeah I need the banter. Yeah. I love it.

Emily:

Happening on camera. So we always had two of them and you know, we’re lucky in the fact that all four of them speak very well on camera and have a good rapport with each other. And so it was great. And so I will be behind the camera and I, and we used phones and, you know, one point I would have three phones going live to Instagram, Facebook, and one for YouTube, I’m just recording it for YouTube. And then I would read out the questions and we’d answer them real time. So we really encouraged people to send in their queries so that we can answer them on the spot. So it was a really, it was a nice way to get that engagement going as well.

Jane:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. That’s awesome. And I love, and that’s it, you know, I think when the chips are down and you go, oh crap, you know, we don’t necessarily have anything to sell and eat, you know, any, I guess you’ve got something to sell, but we don’t have the 2020 yield to sell. And potentially we’re going into a situation where people might really pull back from buying wine, let alone all of the different services that we’ve had to cut out. Like Celador etc. Sometimes all you can do is just show up for your community, which I think that’s exactly what you’ve done. And that’s, I think the brands, they are the brands, they are the businesses who are going to weather this storm because regardless of what else is happening, that they’re showing up for their community and they’re nurturing those relationships.

Jane:

They’re not just disappearing off the face of the earth and leaving it up to their customers and their tribe and their community to go well, what happened to them? I haven’t seen them for a while. Maybe they went out of business who knows, you know, they’re showing up, but taking it an extra level. So as you said, not just kind of keeping on going with the, with the content, but actually showing up and going, yes, you know, we’re going to have this conversation and we’re going to come to you, raw and organically and show you behind the scenes, which is what people love. People love that on social media. Like that’s what actually creates the engagement you showing up and the dog knocking over the tripod and everyone laughing and having a wine on a Friday afternoon. Like, that’s exactly why people are there. You know, they’re not there to have, you know, advertisement placed in their path every five seconds. So I think you’ve done such an amazing job of doing that and hats off to you to coordinate three different mobile phones, one Instagram, one face.

Emily:

I don’t know if anyone’s got a perfect app out there that can do that. Or, you know, most of them need the laptop and, you know, we were working in places where coverage wasn’t great. And you know, then we’d have, we’re working in an old apple packing shed, which we’ve converted to a bit of a cylinder at the moment. And one day it was absolutely pouring. So the sound was horrendous in the shed. So I’m standing out under umbrella in the rain while the guys are sitting under, under the cover. So anyway, we have many fun moments, but we also like, you know, I think by taking the risk of going live, we also managed to get some really good media out of it. So you know, we picked up by broad sheet Sydney morning Herald, good weekend, and tourism, New South Wales picked it up as well because,

Jane:

Wow. And when you say picked up, what did they do? Well,

Emily:

I mean, in terms of, they were like, you know, these guys are doing live tastings and your actually seeing the winemaker. Yeah. Yeah. So they were doing stories on us doing it. Incredible which was fabulous. It was great media. And it was purely because I think, you know, there weren’t many that were taking the risk of doing it live. And others, it was great to see, you started to build a really nice community around it and those people are still incredibly loyal the ones that, you know, sort of discovered us during that time. Right.

Jane:

Okay. So you’ve had people discover you, it wasn’t just people already in your community, like people came across you as well. Yeah.

Emily:

And now they’ve become really great brand advocates. So whilst it wasn’t, you know, if you sat down and plan that in a traditional marketing way you would go, no, it’s a bit risky. We need to have, you know, some really potent scripts. And anyway, we sort of threw that to the wind and we’re like, let’s just, we’ve got to do something let’s get out there and do it. And, and it was really heartening and encouraging.

Jane:

See, yeah. Yeah. I love that. I love that story. And I think that’s, you know, I think if anything, that 2020 has given us it’s that anything goes kind of thing. Like you can just show up with this stuff and people are all for it because they’re like, okay. Yeah, there’s so much, there’s so many new things to embrace in this world. And good on you guys for being first to market with that and showing up in the right spot, because you chose the right channels to show up. You clearly picked a good time for people to kind of, you know, enjoy that conversation and be in the right mind frame, you know, it’s four o’clock on a Friday, so they could, you know, grab a wine themselves or whatever. So the timing and everything was, was perfect. You made sure that there was that energy on screen between the two presenters and the authenticity of that just resonated throughout the social channels that you chose to show up on. So I think that’s just brilliant. So my question is, do you still do them, I mean, we’re kind of still in COVIDish, so do you still do them and from that learning experience, like how will you incorporate these, you know, moving forward?

Emily:

Yeah, look, great question. We’ve been discussing that as well and look during COVID it was, I have to say easy to do it because the cylinder was shut, you know? We could all get together at a certain time and knew that people were at home at that time. So from that point of view, it was easy. Now that things are back up and running, we know people are out and about again, well, new south Wales, I mean, except for poor Victoria at the moment. But it’s now harder really to get the team together. So we’ve been just a few, we’re just going to pop up in your feed. Like I did a live feed from the school at all the other day. Just talk about what wine was being, you know was popular. The last couple of weekends, we just did one the other day where we were in the vineyard pruning some really young vines.

Emily:

So, you know, showing people how, a bit of a, how to, on how to prune young vines. So it may not be as scheduled, but we are very conscious that we don’t want to not show up anymore. Like we’ve got to keep going and tapping into that. So we’re looking at ways that we can probably do it on a more scheduled basis. And look, some may be prerecorded just for the nature of it, because, you know, trying to do a live from our winery with so much metal and not very good, fine services is a bit tricky. So for some of that, we may pre-record, but yeah, I think don’t underestimate the power of just showing up live. Yes. And it doesn’t have to be polished. It’s just, you know, prolific beats perfect. Yeah. And, you know, progress, not perfection.

Jane:

Yeah. All the memes people. It’s all true.

Jane:

Write them on a post-it note on your notice board. Okay. I love it. Now, something that brings me much joy got to say as a small business owner is I love seeing the marketing that comes out of orange, you know, and, and the surrounding areas. So even on this podcast alone, we’ve had the pleasure of speaking with Sophie Hanson from local is lovely. Holly Manning from Manning PR and events and just like yourself, these are kind of two regionally based business. And there’s so more in orange and I want to get more of them on the podcast who are just doing amazing things. And from the outside, looking in, it just seems like orange seems to be home to this incredibly energetic bunch of entrepreneurs who are just getting business and their marketing. So, right. And we spoke before about, you know, being able to use nano influencers and micro influencers and the opportunity to kind of align with some of these businesses. Do you find that there is first of all, an entrepreneurial kind of energy that resonates in orange, and is this something that you do tap into to kind of and partnerships and sponsorships and not partnerships and influencer marketing aside, do you find that there is that energy in orange and that as businesses you can kind of all kind of collaborate and work together, or even just tap into that kind of ambition?

Emily:

Look, Jane, we are so lucky in orange. We, I don’t know what it is, but there are just so many enthusiastic, talented people who are all willing to work together. It’s, it’s quite amazing really. And actually I was just on a photo shoot with Soph Hanson the other day. So it’s it does come back to, yeah. You know, understanding there’s so much talent out there, but you also have to form a relationship with them. You have to put in some time into getting to understand them and you know, magic comes about when you just chat to these people because you start to find opportunities and just those little brainstorming moments, like the chats in the corridor or the over a coffee, it’s amazing what ideas and collaborations can come about.

Emily:

But I think the important component of that is that you have to think about what you can bring to that partnership, what value you can add, because you know, whilst it’s great to find someone who’s willing to partner, you’ve got to be very conscious that it is a partnership, you can’t just tap into what they’re offering. So then you get that mutual respect and you know, it becomes an ongoing working relationship as well. Yeah. I just find that people in orange are really generous of spirit. Like there is this understanding that we do or want to promote the region together and by working together you know, great, great things can be achieved. So yeah, yeah, no, it’s, it’s increased. And there, now that we’ve got some co-working yeah. Areas, I actually think that they’re facilitating some of these partnerships because like-minded people who working to they’re now all in one spot and, you know, renting space in there and hot desking it’s just conversations with someone you might never meet. Who’s hot desking next to you. I didn’t know that was happening in our age. How can we be part of it or how can you help? So,

Emily:

So those water cooler conversations become a real thing when you’ve, when you’ve actually got all of you in this, in this kind of same little zone. Yeah. That’s amazing. And I think it might not happen in every regional community, but I think that’s part of the power of being within a regional community, because particularly if you can get a bunch of, you know, ambitious, progressive thinkers on board and like-minded, but complimentary so if you’re a vineyard and you’ve got a fantastic retail store there that sells online jumbled you’ve got, Soph Hansen who is a stylist and she has all sorts of different products that you can tap into. And, you know, hole’s obviously a marketing agency, so you’ve got so many and there’s, I’m probably, there’s probably a hundred more on that, that this as well. They’re just the ones that I know about. So you’ve got all these different businesses who can all work together as a team to, to come together as one and, and promote the region. So how do you think other regionally based businesses can really amplify their efforts beyond their region and really galvanize, you know, a nationwide community. So, so looking to expand outside of their geographic boundaries.

Emily:

Yeah. And I think it comes back to the story that you tell, you know, take a risk and get your story out there. And if you can tell it from a different angle, it will get noticed. And look, I agree. I think in orange, we’re very lucky. We have a very proactive community that understands the value of working together to promote a region. And yeah, so recognize the potentially there are other regions that haven’t sort of perhaps collaborated to that point, but I think if you can find collaboration within your community and getting that extra reach from whatever story you’re telling undoubtedly you will get more interest and more focus. And I think whilst we do all focus on social media, I think don’t forget about some of those traditional promotional, you know, the old media release can go a long way as well.

Emily:

And little tips, like just always make sure you’ve got a landscape photo and forming relationships with journalists is very important as well. And also there are organizations out there like tourism, New South Wales, they have some amazing resources that people can tap into and they can guide you. And if you do have a media release or a story about something going on in your region, they do help to amplify it and get it out there. But also I think for some things, don’t, don’t be afraid to tell the bad news as well, right. People I think get very nervous about that. And we ran into that situation. We knew we weren’t going to have a vintage. So people were nervous about us telling that story because potentially it was negative for the region. But for us as a brand, you know, sticking to just being authentic and honest we felt we needed to tell that story. So we did put information out about it and look, it was a bit controversial. But we were just so amazed at the support that we received from it. It really was so encouraging. And if anything, people turn around and went, oh my gosh, you know, people around there are struggling. Let’s go there and support them.

Jane:

A hundred percent. And I was going to say, I don’t know. I think it was that moment. Like when I must’ve come out massive come out by EDM or whether it came out on social, I’m not sure how I actually got that message. But for me, it really like, I went, okay, you know, I know that the Bush fires happened. I know that COVID is a thing, and I know how to fix my business. I know how to fix my client’s business, but how it affects, you know, other businesses, you don’t really even think about it. And so for you to share that story I was like, it endeared, me too. I mean, you’re a friend of mine. You guys are friends of mine anyway, but it endeared me to your brand. And it really did smack of that authenticity and honesty, but it gave me some, some perspective about your business as well.

Jane:

And for me, I was like, well, I’m joining your wine club because, you know, I would much rather hop on board and support you guys then go to, you know, the local chain of bottle shops that we’ve got here. Like it’s far more important, I think, to support small businesses. And sometimes you just forget, you just forget that those small businesses are there. So for that story, it made it real to me and it made. And I know you wouldn’t have done it for sympathy, and I know you wouldn’t have done it as a sales, you know, thing to, to get people on, but it made me want to do that because I thought, well, I want to say this, you know, this small business survive and this vineyard, I know how much work’s gone into to creating this business.

Jane:

You know, why wouldn’t I get behind it in any way that I can. And I think sometimes people need a reminder because they see the glamorous world of wine and champagne and awards and maybe make assumptions that, you know, you’re doing okay, so I love that you’re honest and I love that you tell the slightly, and they’re not necessarily negative stores. They’re just real, you know, this is what happens in, in business. So I love that. I think that’s awesome. What do you love most about what you do?

Emily:

Oh, look, I love the flexibility. You never know every day is different. But also on the other side of that, you never switch off in a family business. You know, it is all consuming, but you have to be quite disciplined to not talk about it at dinner and not talk about it as soon as you wake up in the morning. But it can be incredibly rewarding, you know, if something does go right, and you’re getting good feedback, you’re like, wow, okay. Yeah, we did that. But also on the other hand, you feel every single bump in the road personally. And you know, that is harder than if potentially you’re an employee in a business because you can’t sort of switch off, you’ve got to dust yourself off, pick yourself up and keep going. So but yeah, look, you know, it is incredibly rewarding and like you said, you know, I get to work with wine. I can’t complain.

Jane:

I’m Glad you said there’s still time for me Em.

Jane:

So what about inspiration? Who do you look for inspiration, for what you do?

Emily:

Do you know, I look overseas quite a lot specifically for wine brands. I’m finding myself really looking at the Napa valley, salvatore and things like that. They’re doing some good stuff over there. Like they some of them are telling a great story and again, it’s not necessarily polished, but it’s a great story. And for brands, who don’t have a big marketing team behind them, don’t have a budget. I think you can probably get caught up going, oh, I can’t put that out because it’s, you know, it’s not perfect or, but it is more important to tell your story than to wait to have perfect creative to put out there. It’s, you know, you’ve got to, as you said, you’ve got to keep showing up. So I think in Napa, they’re doing, and one in particular Jordan winery is, is telling a great story.

Emily:

I do also look at some aspirational brands. Cause as you said, we have a method traditional sparkling range, which is, you know, exactly the same way that champagne is made, but obviously we can’t call it champagne. So I look at some of their brands just to look at, you know, how they treat that product. To be honest, sometimes I find it interesting how some of those big brands are quite lazy with the way that they tell their story. I feel a bit bad saying that, but I, I do.

Jane:

Yeah. I think that’s industry wide. I don’t think you should feel bad about that at all. I think sometimes they’ve just got too much money and they don’t have to, you know, they’re complacent. Yeah.

Emily:

There Is complacency there. And I’ll be interested to see when the younger generation who are wanting to form those attachments to brands through mostly through social media. I just wonder how those brands are going to come through in the next, you know, 10 years when that age group is sort of now more their target market. Like have they created that connection? Yes. So I do. I find that quite interesting, but I also think it’s important not to look sideways. Don’t always focus on say, the shopping, the next suburb or the cylinder around the corner to talk specifically about wine. I think you’ve always got to make sure that you’re concentrating on your brand story, your strategy look forward, don’t look sideways. Cause I think you you’ll end up trying to keep up with the Jones’ in a, in way. And you sort of go off sideways rather than being focused on your end game and staying true to your story. But yet it’s such a great idea to get out there, have a look around, see what other people are doing. And it’s not necessarily within, you know, other Australian brands, privacy, see what’s happening out there. Yeah.

Jane:

Oh, a hundred percent. I think that’s great advice. What about when it comes to measurement? What, what are personally the key metrics that you look at to ascertain whether a particular marketing direction or activity or campaign is?

Emily:

Look, you know, there’s certainly the obvious ones, you know, the sales online basilar door versus retail of wine club versus a distributor. So they’re, you know, your based ones that we look at all the time, but we also map out, well I’m up our social media metrics every month and yes, yes, you do have to be disciplined to do that when you know, you’re doing it in a small business, but it it’s so important to map out that engagement and reach and your overall growth because looking at it, you know, you’re looking at it every day. You’re not necessarily seeing the trends. I agree. And it needs to map that out. And it’s also encouraging because you can go back and go, actually, yeah, it’s happening. Like it’s happening, we’re growing and it will help you pinpoint those trends. What are the posts that are getting that greater engagement?

Emily:

And you know, now it’s all about the saves. Like who’s, who’s saving that post. That’s going to get you the wider reach. So think about the content you’re putting out there. That’s going to get the greatest saves and the forwards and, and, you know, test testing, how’s your, you know, Instagram, TV going and I think staying on the same platforms all the time you know, I think LinkedIn is untapped for us. you I see a lot of potential there. So I’m wanting, you know, to start to focus on that more.

Jane:

Yeah. Yeah. And I would agree with you there. And it’s funny that you mentioned that because just recently, I’m pretty sure I saw her Moet and Chandon sponsored campaign to turn up in my feed. And then I also I also saw a, I think it was a fashion week or it was a fashion, something that also, and I thought, yes, finally, like these beta C brands are recognizing that their target audience are seating on LinkedIn. You know, it’s the professionals who have the disposable income that desire the aspirational lifestyles and all the rest. As long as the fee, doesn’t become clogged with irrelevant kind of lifestyle ads. But they stopped me in my track because they were first to market, you know, by the time all the vineyards get in there, we’ll maybe it’s a different story, but I think, you know, for now that would be such an awesome opportunity for a brand like yourselves to actually get in there and make some impact. Because I think it’s a hundred percent a great, a great spot and your target audience are 100% there. It’s just, it’s just making it relevant to the context of that platform. You know? So turning up with the Friday night drinks on LinkedIn would be completely acceptable. Absolutely.

Emily:

Yeah. And you’re right. It’s like, it’s a bit untapped. Like I think people are just if you’re not spending time in LinkedIn, you’re probably not sure about the value in it, but you know, it is Monday to Friday. It is such a great resource to get in there. And, you know, for us, we’ve identified that we do need to you know, focus on that a lot more. So that’s going to be something for the second half of this year that we’re going to look at more and yeah. So, you know, and so yeah, don’t just stay on the same old platform that you’ve been on, you know, try new things. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Jane:

Yep. And so then your measurements, you’re looking at, you’re looking at that engagement. You are looking at the reach you are looking to, you know, to see if there’s trends of reach and engagement and saves or whatever, whatever you’re looking at there. And then I think what the wonderful thing about looking at that data alongside your sales data, depending on which channel they come through and making that correlation between when we show up on social media here, when we’re regular with our EDMs when we introduce something funky, like the lives, you know, that impacts this column over here, where we’re actually getting the sales and it might not be an immediate month, month on month impact, you know, your reach for one month might not affect the sales for that much, but, you know, month on month reach will eventually affect sales. You know, maybe it’s three months or four months down the track depending on the cycles. So that’s great. That’s awesome. Now we’ve spoken about wine so much, and particularly if someone’s listening to this at, at wine o’clock they might wonder how they might find print fee or even connect with you. If they’d like to, to see more about what you do, where, where can they find printhie, and yourself Em.

Emily:

Well, look myself, I am on LinkedIn. I do quite like LinkedIn. So yeah, I’m on there.

Jane:

As Emily swift?

Emily:

You’ll find me there otherwise. Yeah. Printhie wines is the handle on your Facebook and Instagram. We do have a YouTube as well. So yeah, you can visit our website, so, yeah.

Jane:

Awesome, fantastic, fantastic. And the website, of course, if you want to become a wine club member like myself, you can sign up there. So I get the two months delivery. I think I get six bottles of my choice delivered every two months, which I think really if I’m realistic, that should really be happening every two weeks.

Jane:

But that’s awesome. Thank you so much. I loved that. The, insight that you shared, again, you’re very on brand Em, I’m very impressed. That was very authentic. And very honest, which I think is exactly what our listeners love to hear, but there was some absolute nuggets in there in terms of the way that you’re bringing that your marketing to life and how you’re thinking outside of the square. And I love that you’re tapped into such an amazing regional community there. I think there’s so many regional communities and even cities that can learn from how Orange a really kind of amplifying the businesses within the region, which then in fact goes on to amplify the region itself. So well done to you or well done to you. And I thank you very much for sharing all of that insight.

Emily:

Oh, thank you so much for having me, Jane. It’s been a pleasure. It’s been great chatting.

 

 

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