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There’s no doubt about it, social media is an easy, practical and cost-effective marketing channel for small businesses to use.

With a little bit of out of the box thinking, you really don’t need the big bucks to invest in this platform and to achieve a result. And one marketer who is creating some pure magic for her clients on Instagram is Holly Manning.

Hol is the director of Manning PR and Media and she is based in Orange NSW. Holly has spent her public relations career delivering creative campaigns and honing her skills in digital marketing.

In this episode, Holly shares some absolutely winning ideas about how to create clever marketing campaigns on Instagram. She gives some ace examples of what has worked for some of her regionally based small business clients (painters, vets, real estates agents) and how she has managed to move the talkability factor from online to offline.

If you are looking for some small business Insta inspo – this episode is definitely worth a listen!

Join in the conversation about all things marketing in the How to do Marketing Facebook Group.


Episode Transcript:

Jane:

Holly, what do you love about using social media as a marketing and communications tool?

Holly:

Oh look, I think it’s the accessibility and the connectivity. The fact that, back when I was in the old days when I started PR and we would put out a press release and really the people we were forming relationships with were the media because they were our connection to our consumers and our target audience. So we really had to rely on them telling us story and now we can go straight to the source and talk to the target audience. And that’s what I love about social media.

Jane:

Great. Yeah. And me too, it’s like that two way kind of conversation and as you said, you know, just cutting the middle man out. It’s so much more of a relationship that you can build. I’d agree. And so then, when you’re working with businesses to promote them via social media, what are some of the goals and objectives that you would put in place before you start going out and kind of publishing content on their behalf?

Holly:

Well, look, we spend a lot of time working on the message and the brand story because that’s what we need to go back to all the time. And we have some clients who, I think they see what other people are doing and they go, oh, we want to do that. We wanted to do that. And we say, no, let’s go back to what your message is and what your brand story is and make sure that we’re hitting the target that we want to hit and connecting with the audience we want to connect with. And we get quite specific about the audiences because as you know, I mean with some clients, their target audience could be anyone, but we need to be really specific with their campaigns just to reach one audience and the rest just kind of follow or might be there, might not but we just focus on one target audience with one campaign. And so really for us, the objective is to reach that audience and to build that audience. So for example, look at, a law firm and maybe they want to just look at some of the educated affluent people within the community. So they might also be targeting other people. I’ll have them as their clients, but we just want to focus on one specific audience. So we’ll just create a message and a brand story and use that to focus on one audience.

Jane:

Yeah. Right. And how are some of the ways that you work with your client to really deep dive into that target audience. Like, how do you help them decide, well, who is it that we want to target with this content?

Holly:

Yup. The clients that we pull in and say, okay, let’s have a look at your business plan and let’s, who is your target audience? And so many don’t know and they’ve just never really sat down and worked it out. I can’t believe it. And I really say to people, work out what your target audience is. And that is the main goal for us is to work that out and then a market to them. So we spend quite a bit of time sitting down with a client depending on who they are and looking at who their current audience is like that went out and then say, okay, that’s your current audience. That’s great. But now let’s look at who you want to love to have coming in the door. Or who you can see as your future audience or who aren’t you reaching at the moment that you’d like to reach. Or maybe it’s just looking at the ones that you reached in the alignment, but getting them in more consistently. So we do spend a lot of time working on the target audience and making sure that the client is aware of who that audience is. Yeah. Looking at the demographics and the whole thing.

Jane:

Yeah. And I think you make a really good distinction there in terms of the existing audience, like who are your current customers and who do you want your current customers to be? Because sometimes we’ll have a mixture of clients who are really good for our business and when we say really good, we main kind of profitable and who are nice people to work with and who are also likely to value our services and not get stuck on the price or get stuck on, detail that just ultimately shouldn’t matter in the value proposition. And then most importantly, that the types of clients that we want to go on and tell other people about us because they have found the process valuable and they’ve worked with us to make sure that social media marketing works and all that sort of stuff.

So that then everybody gets a good result. It’s a win win. Absolutely. Those advocates. Yeah. And some clients that you work with are not ideal. So it’s, it’s absolutely right that you have to kind of go well out of your existing clients who are the good ones and who are the ones that we don’t want anymore of. And then from a new client perspective, who else is out there that we perhaps haven’t touched on or we haven’t reached. I think that’s a really good point. And you also mentioned, demographics, looking at people from a demographic and a psychographic. And if there’s small businesses there that are unfamiliar with those terminologies that the demographics means like, how old are these people? What’s their education level? What’s their income level? Where are they based geographically? Do they have kids, all of that kind of information and the psychographics relates to how they think. So what drives decisions that they make? What is their biggest problem in life that we can help solve? What do they aspire to be, et cetera, et cetera.

Holly:

That’s right. And I think I’m looking at even creating an avatar or almost visualizing a person. We found it really helpful when we’re trying to be the voice of a company because we have so many different clients and we’re talking to people on social media. So we might have, for example, our painter who’s just a tradie, he’s a blokey bloke, but he’s also going to be in the houses of women who are at home. You know, quite often they want to feel comfortable around him. He’s into wine, which is something that most tradies may not be into. So we need to look at his avatar, but we also need to look at his target audience avatar. So when I may have a time in like almost create a, you know, he’s Judy and she likes to drink coffee with her girlfriends. She has two children. She’s at home, her husband’s out. And she’s going to be a potential client. So she’ll need something to talk to you about. She doesn’t feel awkward around you. So why would she need a painter? Is she the decision maker? Yes. Quite often.

But yeah, getting into that mindset of let’s put a visual around her and actually jewel her up and see what she does all day and that gives us a really good sense of how to talk to her.

Jane:

Yeah. And it gives the avatar I guess a personality. It makes that person real. And as we said before, social media is this channel that you can actually have conversations with people. So it helps if you actually know the type of people that your you’re aiming to have conversations with. And I think that’s a really good point that you make around that you’re building kind of to advertise there. Who the client is particularly you if the business has a person or people within that business that are going to go out and be the front face of that organization and dealing with the customers and having this particular avatar for that because it makes sense to kind of match this person from the business with this person who is the customer and work out well, what is it that you’re going to have in common? I love that your painter has a pension for wine. He’s awesome. Yup. Oh

Holly:

Yeah. It’s just this, well he’s one guy, but he’s got a whole team and he’s actually really busy. But he values what we can bring to his business in terms of marketing. And we actually started with Instagram with him a long time ago and Facebook. But, we’ve found that he’s hashtag the bold painter, which he started up, it took off and now people know him as the bald painter from Instagram. So it’s hilarious.

Jane:

That’s awesome. There you go, the bald painter. I’m going straight to go in and search that up. Nice. Speaking of social media platforms, what’s your favourite social media platform to work with and why?

Holly:

Okay. Well definitely Instagram. For so many reasons. I think there are no parameters with Instagram. It’s the same with Facebook. I mean you’re so flexible in the medias that you can use, so video photos and just writing, but with Instagram it really is about the imagery and our business is very much photo, video focused. So that’s why we love Instagram. And I think also the interaction that we’re seeing on it. I think people go to Facebook too. I mean, Facebook is fantastic and we’d never drop that at all. But, I personally go to Facebook to see what my friends are doing and to spend time with family. And I, sometimes feel if the business isn’t getting it right on Facebook, I feel like they’re interrupting me. And disruptive marketing is great as well, but it has to be right.

Holly:

Whereas with Instagram, I find that people go on there knowing that there are businesses there and they’ve following businesses, they expect to be marketed to from businesses and they’re ready to shop. And that is amazing. So the fact that you can build relationships, it’s not confronting. They don’t feel like you’re getting in their way. They want to see content from you. As long as it’s beautiful imagery. A lot of females, but men are getting onto Instagram more and more as well. We’re seeing, I think, January 2020, there’s 16 million active users in Australia on Facebook. Then YouTube would be next, 15 million on YouTube. And then the next one is Instagram with 9 million monthly active users. So it’s growing and growing. And there are just so many different areas.

Holly:

It’s almost overwhelming with, you know, you’ve got your newsfeed, but then you’ve got Insta stories and you’ve got the highlights and you’ve got IGT V and I think what Facebook and Instagram who are both owned by the same company, Mark Zuckerberg, I think what they try to do is be everything to everyone. They’re trying to do the Snapchat thing with Insta stories and they want to be YouTube with IGTV and they pulling it all in. And at the moment with things like that, Insta story and our IGTV. Insta stories have got advertising in it a little bit, but not many people are using that IGTV. There’s no advertising yet. So it’s like this beautiful free area where you can watch lots of beautiful things and not be interrupted.

Jane:

Yeah. Wow. That’s a really good reason to love Instagram. And yes, I think I love your distinction in terms of as a user, you know, you feel like Facebook’s almost that sacred kind of intimate space for you and your friends and your family to share. So you feel like your being invaded a little bit by brands that aren’t getting the advertising right as you say, if they’re slotting into the newsfeed and they’re valuable to you, okay, forgiven, but if they’re not, bugger off. And I laugh that you said, that Instagram people are probably a little bit more prepared for brands to be there and to show up. And I’m sure too that people don’t have a tolerance for the brands that are getting it wrong on Instagram and they can scroll straight past them but that they’re ready to buy.

I think that’s a really, really good reason to be there. If your an Instagram shoppable kind of brand and you’re right in terms of how you want to consume that content, you’ve got longer form content with Instagram TV, you’ve got the short little snippets of stories and then the newsfeed content as well. But something that I think a lot of small businesses don’t know much about right now is that Instagram TV and I know that this is a space that you’ve recently spent a lot of time kind of getting to know and experimenting with. So can you tell us what kind of companies are using Instagram TV? What kind of content are they sharing? You know, how are we supposed to use this?

Holly:

Well, there are less than I would expect companies using it and the ones that are using it are still trying to work out how to use it. And I think that best way of thinking of IGTV or Instagram TV is like YouTube. Most people are putting videos up that are around four minutes long, but I think you can go up to 10 minutes, but God knows why you’d want to do that. But for me, roughly what people seem to be doing and companies like a lot of sporting companies are using it and and TV channels like Netflix, ESPN, I’m American, a lot of them, but it isn’t interesting to see how they using it. So people like ESPN, which is a sporting channel over in America, they have created their own branded templates that they use so that if things get shared or if anyone’s watching it, they’re constantly, they have that brand there in front of them. Some companies like what you see, three birds, renovations, you know the girls.

Jane:

Yes, yes. They are on YouTube, aren’t they?

Holly:

Yeah. Yeah. So they’re starting to do a few things and even if you go have a look at their IGTV the biggest one for them, and I must admit I’ve watched it like three times, is how to fold a fitted sheet.

Jane:

Yes, I want to know that!

Holly:

You’ve got to watch it because it works really well, but it does hurt your brain a bit the way that they do it, but he does a lot of like sticking a hands into the middle of the sheet and folding it over, but you really need the video to look at it and it’s gone so well. So I think just little instructional videos like that. There’s a lot around. Elle magazine do these thing where they get celebrities to they give them five words and they’ve got a find a song that’s got a word in it and sing a bit of that song. Like, so simple and basic. I mean, that’s celebrities and that’s a big, it’s a bit different in regional Australia, isn’t it? Because we can’t tap into that, but you can certainly collaborate with them. All the businesses, how to videos are definitely big. I think if you can educate and entertain, those are my three big ones. Any way that you can make people feel like they’re learning something, help them out, you giving information. And entertaining people at the same time. That’s how we can certainly use it more and more. And incorporating your branding in terms of colours as you would with Instagram anyway. Yeah. And just using your voice. People just want to get to know you. The business.

Jane:

Yeah. And look I would agree with that. I must say I haven’t spent, a lot of time we’ve only just started posting some videos in there ourselves for Dragonfly. And I haven’t even spent a lot of time kind of in there consuming content. I think I saw Roxy Jacenko had kind of set up some campaigns in there. I think I only saw one or two. And Mia Freedman, I must say I got stuck on one of her videos. She always does everything so well. God love her. Mia Freedman from Mamma Mia. And I think what they did was, and it was exactly as you said, it was like a how to… And she had one of their makeup team come and show how to put eye shadow on. And I was captivated, I was so busy at the time, I had so many things that I had to do and I got lost in this video of how to put my makeup on.

Holly:

I know, isn’t it just such a rabbit hole? I think we spend a lot of our time and it all research admittedly, but you can get quite lost. And I think for regional businesses to look at, other businesses in the area that are doing great things and they could be big international businesses. Yeah. Just fun wise too. Like pretty much copycat. Just do your own version of that. So take inspiration. Exactly. Yet these big marketing companies that are working for them and coming up with this, it’s just sharing the love.

Jane:

Yeah. I agree. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel. And as you said, you don’t need to copy it word for word, but if you can see that something’s working for another business, why wouldn’t you kind of take some inspiration as to that kind of thing and apply it to your own. So then, what are your biggest tips for businesses wanting to use the Instagram TV platform? I think bearing in mind that a lot of small businesses won’t have, actually, they might not have even hopped onto the Instagram TV platform, you know, where do they start with this? What do you recommend they do?

Holly:

Yeah, look, I know for a lot of people it’s very overwhelming to even be on camera. And the frustrating thing for us is that we see that a lot of people want to see the people behind the business. And business owners get scared and go, oh, but I don’t want to be in front of the camera. I feel uncomfortable. And awkward. We ay to our clients just jump on, like make a time. I do it all the time. I hardly put anything of my own stuff up, but every Monday morning, just the five minutes, I’ll put the camera on me and just do a little spiel. Most of it’s just sitting on my phone or I’ll delete it straight away, but it’s just getting used to being in front of a camera. I guess the other thing to do is if you are just dreading it and hate being in front of the camera is to interview other people.

So it sort of makes you look like the expert and you’re asking the questions that people would frequently ask you. So it means that you can talk to somebody else, another business and ask the questions that people would always want to ask them or of you. So it gives you somebody to bounce off, and you can still pull your personality out and they put it out there without feeling so confronted that you’re looking down the barrel of the camera. So that helps. What other ideas have they, I think that’s how to’s are really great. And I think anytime you can think, Oh, what’s the question that people always ask me about my business, just answer that or the top three. And the, other thing is testimonials. So if you can, I know with real estate we’ve got a few real estate clients and as well as putting out videos of particular properties, we find talking to say a mortgage broker about what’s the best, if you’ve never bought a house before, what are the first steps talking to them about that. The testimonials, which is more just your best clients who just love you saying, would you mind just jumping in front of my phone for a couple of seconds and yeah, that’s right. And at least these days you can do it on a phone. It’s not as confronting as a big camera that’s right.

Jane:

That’s right. Yeah. Gosh, that’s some really good tips there. And cause you’re absolutely right. Like one of the main things about getting on Instagram TV is that you actually have to create the video content. And for a lot of businesses that video content is going to star you or your customers. But I love your idea about, interviewing other people because then it takes the emphasis off you, if you don’t want it to be all about you. But it still aims to add value and that how to kind of content, which is exactly where YouTube stemmed from. Is that how to. That’s exactly why people became so famous on YouTube was because they were adding value with showing people how to do things like fold, fitted sheets. How have I not discovered that YouTube video. How have I not searches for it? My goodness. A life long challenge. Gosh. Yeah. No, that’s great. Good advice. And of course when you’re filming for Instagram TV, you do actually have to have your phone. Is it in portrait mode or in, in square mode? Or is either fine?

Holly:

We find, so if you can shoot in 4K so if you go into your phone settings, you can choose the size of the video that your using. So if you go in there to settings and choose 4K, which is the highest setting, really for video, it means that the quality is going to be good enough that if you do a shoot horizontally at landscape that means that you can, it’ll turn the other way as well. You can cut in a bit more and that can be vertical. So with IGTV, people are now filming just straight vertical. You can do either, so you’ll see that, for the first minute, first 58 seconds, you can watch it in your Instagram newsfeed and then it’ll say to keep watching, click on the IGTV button and then it goes into vertical, right?

Yes. So that’s a bit, it’s tricky in that sense. But look, I think for small businesses, I don’t want to overwhelm people. I think it’s just testing the waters. And my biggest tip for people, we’ve done this with our real estate client, Fitzgerald Estate Agents early on and we’ve sort of changed track now, but the people in Port Macquarie or wherever they are regional Australia, people are really proud yeah. Of the town with Instagram you can search. So for us we searched the hashtag orange NSW but you guys would be Port Macquarie. Yeah. They’re looking for beautiful photos that people have taken of your town and you can pull them all together. You just tag them all, just small tag down the bottom or you can just list them all in your Instagram feed, but you can pull all of those images together and create a little slideshow with a bit of music behind it using Splice, which I love Splice is an app. It’s like an editor basically if you find content. So pull it all together and create this beautiful montage of your hometown just with photos and videos.

Jane:

Sure. Good idea Holly.

Holly:

And you don’t have to do anything really apart from sit there and edit a bit.

Jane:

So in that case, because you’re kind of pulling other people’s photo into what you are repurposing as your own content, do you just tag the people that are finally took the photo to make sure it’s all legit?

Holly:

Yep. So, that’s the great thing about Instagram. People have posting things to be shared. So as long as you give them a bit of credit and we found with its Fitzgerald Estate Agents, we’d post it every second shot. We do a, a full sale or a sold image of his or brand it up. And then we do a beautiful shot of orange and we just say, look at this fantastic shot taken by blah, tag them in. If you’re giving them a little love, then we’ve never had anyone complain. And then you find other people come to your site knowing we’ve had, you know, the actual visitor centre and the tourism guys come to his page just to source content because they knew that we’d gone to public planning at all. Share it from my page. So yeah, shots out there. So you just have to look up the, yeah, go to the keywords, the hashtag, all the locations. That’s the other one. You can search for the region.

Jane:

Yeah. And you’veand particularly in the Central West and particularly orange because you’ve got such amazing brands around there, you’ve got some fantastic regional, photographs that are being taken and uploaded even just by every day kind of people because they’ve all beautiful properties and orange is beautiful. It’s the same with Port Macquarie. You know, we’ve got so many beaches and we’ve got so many talented photographers in the region and I’m sure, you know, every region has a beautiful part, whether it’s the architecture, the main street, the people of the regions or the geographical stuff. Pulling that together as part of your brand story is such a great idea. And it does demonstrate that kind of community, collaboration and that community involvement as well, which is, as you said, Holly, so true.

Jane:

So important and endearing to people within a particular region. Great take. So what about from a branding perspective? So we’ve got these ideas of, you know, getting people on video and maybe re-purposing some other photos from the region and all the different ways that we can kind of tell our story on Instagram. What are some of the branding considerations that small businesses might need to consider if they’re going to be posting regular content so that they can build up, that consistent brand positioning, especially if we’re using different photos and different interviews and different people, how can they pull it all together with their branding?

Holly:

Well I think the main thing to think about is that you are not on these social media platforms for you to just keep burning out. All the service does that you have, and I mean that’s kind of what you want to embed in there, but at the end of the day, you’re there for them. So what’s in it for the customer and the target audience? Or the people that are looking at your content. So keep that in mind all the time. Try not to do the sell, sell, sell, just give, give, give. So, definitely take a look at like minded brands and see what they’re doing. Have a look at what the services are that you have and maybe every five posts or every five videos you’d talk about that. Yeah. Otherwise you want to really empower them with knowledge or entertain the people that are reading your content or looking at your imagery.

We find that keeping your brand colours or just little hints of your logo. Or say you’ve got a circle in your visuals trying to incorporate circles. Keeping a lot of space on your newsfeed so that everything’s nice and clean and clear. I find that sometimes our clients get a bit excited, especially the hotels and they might have something on this weekend and they’re panicking and they need to shout out at it. So they’ll put a lot of text on a post and I can’t stand text, but Facebook and Instagram don’t like it either so they’ll call it off and it just won’t reach as many people. But what I’ll do is I’ll go back at the end of the month through the feed and just clean out any ones that were like Happy Easter, that’s gone now. So let’s clean that off. And just keep the beautiful imagery. Focus on your brand colours and things like Canva, which is an app that a lot of people know about. An Aussie app and once you know your brand colours and you can use the little hash tag, key word, what do you call it? You know, the colour, I’m not a designer, but anyway, your colours.

Jane:

And you can enslave those little… Well, the Pantone kind of, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Holly:

You know, those, just say that somewhere. If you don’t have the professional Canva subscription, as long as you know your colours, just keep using those every now and then with the backgrounds or shapes or if you have to have text on something. And that just means that when you’re looking at your news feed, you just want it to look clean and pretty and well branded. And you can do the same with IGTV. You could use, if you’ve got a title, you can use your colours. And I think that’s really important because it is such a visual thing.

Jane:

Yeah. And there’s subtle little hints, like they’re not big blurts of your logo, as you said, kind of dominating the image, like a kind of overly overt, references to your brand. It’s just subtle, subtle little colours or fonts. Yes, perfect example. Yeah. So it’s still contributing to that brand story and it’s still building up memories in people’s minds. But it doesn’t have to be that really overt promotion of your brand. So, that would be a big mistake. I would imagine is being too overt with your selling and promoting using the platform, what are some of the other mistakes that you see businesses made with their social media marketing efforts?

Holly:

I think other things that I say quite a bit are that you’re hiding yourself. You’re not putting yourself out there. A lot of a lot of businesses, well, the people that own the businesses, they’re so busy talking about the services that they have or yeah, it’s great when they can show some of the people in their business, but at the end of the day, people want to see you. We find that more often than not, the posts with the most engagement and reach are the ones where it’s you just in front of the camera. So they don’t have to be beautiful, pretty photos of me taken by professionals. But people want to see the people behind the business. So even if we can just, once every month pop a picture up of yourself it would be amazing.

Holly:

It definitely makes a big difference. And I think using stock imagery is another thing. So just grabbing something from the internet, looks so American or even Aus stock, which is great cause it’s Australian photos somehow you really notice a difference using Aus stock is good, but if you could get a professional photographer, say you’re a restaurant or a cafe, if you could even just video seasonal menu, get a professional photographer to come in and just go crazy and pull together a library of shots that you then you can then use for three months or so. That makes such a difference. People don’t mind if you were to use the same photo a couple of times throughout your feed. Just having that bank of photos that you can go to makes a big difference.

And I think it’s just encouraging conversation. Remember that you are trying to have that two way conversation with people. So ask questions and do little quizzes and have a bit of fun with things. Use Insta story. It’s fantastic. It’s so much fun. I know businesses are very busy, but if you can find the time just to create a little quiz and Insta grant actually gives you in the create section on instant story, it gives you ideas of the sort of things you can ask people and all the fun you can have. So yeah, use it, have fun with it.

Jane:

I agree with you. Look, it’s not just Instagram where I hate stock shots. Like I just hate stock shots full stop. The only exception to the rule that I sometimes use is actually the Unsplash site, from every now and again just for blog posts and things. Because sometimes when you’re a service, it’s really hard to actually, have photos, because your product is intangible and you can only post so many photos of MacBook’s.

But yeah, like on Instagram I think where your telling your personal story and creating your kind of unique look and feel, there’s just no room for those stock shots because A, everybody’s seeing them and B, people can say a bloody stock shot coming from miles away. People know that, and all of a sudden there’s no authenticity. You’ve kind of lost any opportunity to connect I think. So, I think that’s a really good point. You’ve shared already some great examples of some case studies or stories about how some of the businesses that you’ve worked with have had significant positive impact by using Instagram, particularly with the real estate and they’re kind of leverage of the nuance of regional inclusion, I guess, and regional reference in the posts. Have you got any other stories about businesses that have used Instagram really cleverly and got some really good results?

Holly:

Oh, look we have found most of our clients that are targeting people that use Instagram. And I think you have to be really careful there that you consider your target audience. And are they using Instagram? Facebook is always going to be for regional areas that’s going to be your go to. But with Instagram we’ve found probably one of our success stories is with Orange Vet Hospital. I mean, you’re working with animals, so you’re always going to win there anyway. We’ve found I think a lot of people that have pets, post images on Instagram and you’ve see so many pets having the own Instagram accounts, I just can’t believe. But anyway, you’ve got to make the most of these things. So we were finding that a lot of people in orange love coffee, we have so many cafes, it’s ridiculous.

People follow their favourite cafes on Instagram. And we decided to make that connection with pets and cafes by creating the Orange Vet Pet Cafe hashtag. We went around to all of the cafes to see if they’re pet friendly. So if they have the a water bowl out the front of the cafe, if they had pet treats on the menu, which is the ultimate, not many have that at this stage, but we were trying to encourage more cafes to be pet inclusive. While also tapping into that Instagram love of coffee, cafes and pets. So we gave certificates out to the cafes that were pet friendly, so we’d get a photo of the owner of the cafe holding their certificate, and we had a competition where we ask people, which is your favourite cafe, with pets, and you’d win a voucher to that cafe. So then take your pet there for a coffee and you know, the pet to enjoy some dog ball action.

Jane:

So that’s such a good idea.

Holly:

And it’s always growing because I think a lot of businesses go, okay, I can’t. And I think in the old days of PR, you’d try and do everything so well and set it all up exactly all at the same time to happen. We’ve decided the easiest way is to just do it in little bits. So we started with the competition with the locals asking them, which is their favourite cafe. Then we went in and looked at all of the cafes and gave them the certificates. And now we’re looking at the IGTV of actually going to each of these cafes and doing a little video with them, with Orange Vet Hospital and you know, reviewing it from adult’s point of view and there’s so many things you can do. So it’ll be just this growing building thing that just keeps going

Jane:

I love it. That’s so creative. And my next question for you is about measurement. How can businesses measure Instagram efforts and I think it would be great if you had an example of how you measured the impact of that campaign. What are the things that you’re looking at for that campaign to go, okay, how we actually know if this is working out? If this is successful or moving the kind of business needle I guess.

Holly:

Yeah, absolutely. I think, well the great thing about Facebook and Instagram is that you do have those insights and I encourage everyone to go into their insights and have a look at, well firstly Facebook, fantastic to be able to see, and Instagram, you can see not only who your audience is that’s currently looking at your page, within men, women, their ages, where they’re from, but also what hours and days that they’re on their social media. So it pretty much can tell you, okay, if I’m just going to post twice a week even, and Tuesdays and Thursday nights at eight o’clock are the peak times. And that’s every week. You show up on those days at those times, and then anything else is just additional and fantastic. But if you’ve got access to those analytics, you should definitely be using them.

So we tend to look at the insights, we keep a check of that. We do a monthly report for our clients and for things like this campaign, it’s going to be constantly growing. But to be able to see, if those posts are shared by the cafes for example, if there’s a photo they share, then that is definitely a big tick. If anyone starts using a hashtag that we’ve created, like the bald painter or if they start tagging him into things. That’s what you want to see, is when people start using those hashtags and your tag because they want you to se things. Then I think the great thing about regional Australia that you can’t use as much in Metro is word of mouth. People come up to Simon Robert, who’s the painter and say, Oh, you’re the bald painter. Then we know we have definitely ticked some boxes. And then if he gets one job, he’s paid for his marketing for a year. So that’s the big thing. If we can show our clients that they have got a new client or got a job because of that social media, then we tick the big box.

Jane:

Yeah. And Holly, I love that answer because what you’re measuring there has significant impact to a business. As you said, if someone’s coming up to someone that didn’t previously know that painter, if someone’s coming up to the painter and going, are you the bald painter? And then they get into a conversation and that leads to a job, like at the end of the day, that shifts the business needle in the right direction. And as you said, it’s about people sharing that content or using that hashtag, which is a level of engagement that is much further beyond simply liking a post or giving the love heart in Instagram. Certainly looking at things like how many people have seen this post and how many people have liked it. Sure, that’s important somewhere along the lines, but as you’ve said, the measurements that you’re looking for is significant change.

Jane:

Someone’s actually picked up this content and shared it to their network and having further amplified it by hundreds, possibly thousands. So I think they’re really, really great and sound measurements. Awesome. Holly, gosh you’ve had some amazing insight and I’ve loved your case studies and examples. I’ve loved your reference to two regional areas and how businesses can really kind of take advantage of being in regional areas because as you said there’s more chance that people know people and that will talk. And so bringing that kind of stuff from Instagram into conversations is powerful. If people want to know more from you Holly, or if they want to see some of your work, where can they find you?

Holly:

Oh, Jane. Well of course we’re all over social media. So we are in PR and events on Instagram and Facebook and currently redoing our website. So think we’re really lucky in regional areas that we are so accessible. So your business and my business, I think that’s the great thing about it is that we’re here. I think we’re alike like that. We are here to help regional businesses succeed and we are so happy to give away as much information as needed to these businesses to see them succeed. And quite often we’ll see people on Instagram businesses and go Oh God, if they just did this it would just make it so much better, so we’ll contact them and say, or if there’s a like a spelling mistake or we’ll contact them and go, Oh guys, just letting you know if you did this, that would help you engage with more people.

So we’re really lucky that we have some fantastic clients, very loyal clients that we’ve had for six years. But we’re also discovering new businesses all the time and new businesses are starting and we just want to see them succeed. And, and you know, we want to sort of not take down the big giant chain shops, but I want to see boutique businesses succeed in regional Australia and they can, so I love the fact that people are really shopping locally more and more. And that’s what we’re here for to help them do that. So yeah, jump on and have a look for us and contact us if you’ve got any questions. We’re always happy to hear from people from anywhere in regional Australia.

Jane

Awesome. So Manning PR and Media and you’re on Instagram and Facebook and you can Google you to find your website as and LinkedIn of course. Brilliant. Thank you so much for that Holly. Really, really appreciate it.

Holly:

Well, thanks for having Jane. It was such fun.

 

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